Living On Campus Testimonials

Cailtlin's Experience

“I’m not a shy person.”

Since arriving on campus, Caitlin hasn’t wasted any time getting involved. “I’m not a shy person, so I’m not afraid of putting myself out there. I think that’s helped me a lot,” said Caitlin.

Caitlin Polley

She is the president of Hutchens Hall Council, a member of the Residence Hall Association, a centennial leader and a member of SGA, CCM and SAC. She credits her involvement with her smooth transition into college life: “The friends that I have made helped me and getting involved. If you get involved in an organization, that really helps.”

“We should make a chore list.”

Caitlin admits that she was a little nervous to meet her roommates. “Those three chose to live together, and I was just thrown in there. I was afraid of being the fourth wheel,” she said. “It turns out that we are all pretty similar, so it worked out.”

Caitlin admits that she was a little nervous to meet her roommates. “Those three chose to live together, and I was just thrown in there. I was afraid of being the fourth wheel,” she said. “It turns out that we are all pretty similar, so it worked out.”

Alonzo's Experience

“It’s a big network of friends.”

Finding a major isn’t the only smooth transition Alonzo has experienced while at Missouri State; he describes his overall transition to living independently as easy. “The transition has been pretty easy because I’m really close to home,” he said. “I roomed with a guy I know from high school, too, so that was a lot easier, just knowing and trusting someone.”Alanzo Perez

He also credits the friends he’s made at college as a big part of his great transition. “My friends on campus—that’s what makes everything easier,” he said. “It’s a big network of friends. Most of the friends I have now either live on my floor or I met them through friends that I knew from back home.”

Alonzo and his friends enjoy going to the free movies in the PSU and catching up-and-coming musical artists at concerts sponsored by Student Activities Council.

“It’s a lot.”

Although he quickly adjusted to life on campus, Alonzo admits that he was surprised by the difference between his high school and college classes.

“My first semester I took a religion and a history class, which required a lot of reading. I realized that if I didn’t read, I wouldn’t pass the tests,” he said. “In high school, if you didn’t read, you would still pass the test. I think that’s what has surprised me the most—the amount of time you have to put into your studies. It’s a lot.”

Despite the extra studying, Alonzo describes his professors as caring about his success as a student: “They don’t want you to fail. They may offer extra credit for extra work or things like that, if you make the effort.”

Kirby's Experience

“It’s gotten to the point where I’ve slipped up and called this place home occasionally.”

The Oklahoma native is looking forward to the challenge of living on her own. “I was most looking forward to being on my own and seeing if I could do that. I thought that would be kind of fun—see if I could actually survive,” Kirby said.

Kirby WilliamsDuring her first semester at college, Kirby has done more than just survive. “It’s been really great. It’s gotten to the point where I’ve slipped up and called this place home occasionally,” she said. “I can’t emphasize enough the environment of Missouri State, which helps so much. They want you to literally belong here.”

“Scheduling in sleep is pretty mandatory.”

Kirby, an Honors College student, didn’t waste any time getting involved in campus organizations, such as SGA, Scholar’s House Hall Council, Gamma Pi Alpha and more. Through trial and error, she is tackling the toughest challenge of college so far: time management.

“Probably the best thing anybody can do is get involved because then the time will fly by so fast. You need to be involved but not too involved. I was originally involved in so many organizations I thought I was going to join, and I was taking a full course load. I just realized that I can’t do this. I had to scale back and choose those that were really important to me,” she said. “From there, you have to adjust and get some sleep—scheduling in sleep is pretty mandatory.”

Joey's Experience

“Knowing that I can actually do this and not get overwhelmed”

Joey explains that his SOAR group and the lacrosse team helped him transition smoothly into life in Missouri: “Some people are afraid of college, I feel like, but I’ve made a lot of friends so far.”

Joey Saba

The friends didn’t ease all the nerves about the first day of classes. “I felt so overwhelmed, but now I feel way better about my classes. That is probably one of the more memorable things: knowing that after the first couple of weeks that I can actually do this and not get overwhelmed by everything. I started to feel more comfortable,” he said.

“I sit in my room sometimes and think, ‘What do I do?’”

Joey was in for one surprise when it came to his new life as a Bear — free time. “The down time was definitely a shock,” said Joey. “I sit in my room sometimes and think, ‘What do I do?’ I get done with classes at one o’clock.”

He admits some of that extra time gets spent on homework. “It also surprised me how much I have to work in my classes. I go to every class, but it’s still a lot of outside work. I can’t skate by,” he said.